Mono-culture, or mono-cropping, is when agriculturalists raise the same species year after year. This practice leads to the buildup of pests and diseases and their subsequent rapid spread. A uniform, mono-culture crop is susceptible to pathogens.

Sound familiar? Nature has been trying to tell us in the experiment we call agriculture that she does not play nice with unattached organisms. It seems on a cultural level the global community is becoming somewhat of a mono-culture. The world is connected by more than the price of bread. Global business speaks the universal language of supply to the demand of the highest bidder.

“Global business speaks the universal language of supply to the demand of the highest bidder.”

In short, our homogenized cultural paradigm is the global uniform of globalization and nature is letting us know that globalization will not be without consequence. Our immune system as a species has become weakened. Markets may crash, distribution of staple goods might get cut off, and people around the world get sick. We will call this the mono-culture effect.

It is time to rebuild our immune system on all levels. How do we build a resilient system? The answer is also found in the garden. Diverse, collaborative networks, exchanging nutrients. There is no better model of wealth distribution than that of a healthy ecosystem.

“There is no better model of wealth distribution than that of a healthy ecosystem.”

So, what does it look like when a business mirrors these networks. It looks like a couple of artists, an economist, farmers (including urban ones), a forager, a cleaning company, chefs, a garden, a cameraman, a lawyer, a professor, a cultural analyst, the music industry, a marketer, a credit union, a technocrat, a venture capitalist, a passionate amateur, and a salad dressing to create a food distribution service that connects people to place through food. We are a network creating jobs in a burnt marketplace, coming to the table with special gifts each one of us brings, aligned with passion and values you can taste in every recipe we share.

We all have a choice: to hideaway during the virus or act. As it turns out, in addition to a pandemic, we are on the front lines of a food and business revolution. Working together to create and offer solutions, the Wild Food Box is about going home, to our roots, our community, and digging up solutions that foster economic resilience during tough times.

The most revolutionary thing you can do right now is to grow a garden, but until then we’re here for you at the Wild Food Box.

Enviro-pocalypse Looms: UN Report Claims One Million Species At Risk Of Extinction

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